Training

CubandadultNow that you have the youth interested in scouting, this is the time to educate the parents and get the family signed up. Approach the night as a Sign Up Night not a Recruitment event, you have a youth attending your pack meeting, ready to go. Your job is to get the family signed up. Go into the night with the approach that no one leaves without filling out an application and paying their initial fees.

The Marketing and Membership Hub has a Sign Up Night Playbook available to help set up a successful event.

Prior to Sign Up Night

  • Contact the location where you have your pack meetings in the spring to make your reservation for a September Sign Up Night. If you have already reserved the location, double-check!
  • Invite your Unit Commissioner and your District Executive to attend Sign Up Night. They can help answer questions that families may have, provide moral support, and just by being there they show scout leadership within the community.

Sign Up Night Set Up

  • Create a display area with craft items, pictures of den outings and day camp, uniforms, books, and anything else that people might be interested in looking at and that they can touch. This table should also be available to the kids.
  • Have a sign in sheet for all new families at the display area.
  • Encourage current den leaders to greet new families, have them sign in, and take a look at the items on display.
  • After your opening ceremony and announcements separate the parents from the kids. Provide some type of entertainment for the kids leaving them with some of your current parents and take new parents to a separate area. This way you will have their undivided attention as you educate them about scouting and get their scout signed up.

Registration Area

  • Prepare a script for the evening that describes scouting in general and includes information about your pack specifically. Have different leaders in your pack read different parts of the script. Make the presentation as professional as possible.
  • Tables should be set up with table tents listing the grade level and Cub Scout rank. Each table will form a den. Parents should be directed to sit at a table associated with their scout's grade.
  • Each table should have the following:
    • BSA Youth and Adult applications
    • Pens
    • Form to write down den members and their contact information
    • List of items to purchase, IE uniform, book
    • Pack calendar of events for the next few months or the annual calendar
    • List of associated fees
    • Any pack specific registration materials
  • Each table will form a den
    • A Den Leader will be recruited from the table. There may be more than one Den Leader.
    • Do not leave the new den leader "in the dark." Provide them a district training schedule, better yet, have a current Den Leader meet with the new Den Leader to get them started. Share materials! Your goal is to make the den leaders feel comfortable and not overwhelmed.
  • BSA registration forms should be filled out and fees paid that night. Do not let families leave without registering their child. State multiple times that financial aid is available. If your pack is not able to provide aid, contact your DE. Money is never an obstacle.
  • Provide an incentive to register, give the new scout a pack T-shirt when registering that evening.
  • Talk about your fund raiser and what you do with the funds raised.
  • Talk about day camp and the activities that the scouts get to participate in such as BB guns and archery. Let them know a probable price point for day camp and remind that about what a great bargain it is.
  • Talk about community service projects and family oriented events. Remind parents that scouting is a family activity. You can bring along the younger (and older) siblings.
  • List out what the kids did over the past year: BB guns, archery, pinewood derby, hiking, biking, rocket launch, day camp.
  • Let families know that Scouting is a true bargain. The more activities the family participated in, the bigger the return on their investment in Scouting. Their monetary investment will be relatively small compared to anything else that they participate in.
  • Scouting does not have to be an "either or" activity. Remind parents that most youth in scouting also participate in soccer, baseball, basketball, math club, taekwondo, and many other activities. There is not penalty for missing a pack meeting or a den meeting. Youth are always welcome at Scouts.
  • Talk about famous Cub Scouts and who is/are an Eagle Scout. Give some statistics about kids who participate in Scouting, IE very few appear in the juvenile court system; 3 out of 4 leaders in business, politics and religion were Scouts at one time.

Information for New Boy Scout Parents and Volunteers, let’s get you started….

Welcome to the adventure of Scouting in the Chief Seattle Council.  Whether you are crossing over from a Cub Scout Pack into an existing troop, someone brand new to Scouting, or building a new Troop, we are here to help you begin your journey.  If you are unable to find the answers you need in the information provided here, please contact your Unit Leader or District Executive.

 Crossing over from Cub Scout Pack?

New to Scouts?

Starting a New Troop?

Ongoing Information

Earning Your Eagle

Volunteer Opportunities

Chartering Partners

Crossing over from Cub Scout Pack?

This is an exciting time, your journey to Eagle Scout is just beginning.  A Troop functions very differently than a Pack.  A Troop is youth-led.  Advancements include both rank advancements and merit badges.  Rank advancement is based on completing skills and outings, and is not limited to an annual cross-over event.  Merit badges provide an opportunity to learn about a wide variety of subjects and interests.  Merit badges also play an important role of the journey to Eagle.

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New to Scouts?

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Starting a New Troop?

Starting a new troop is exciting and involves a solid partnership between the Council professional and volunteers who will serve the members of the new unit.

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Ongoing Information

To keep current on what is going on in our program there are several sources:

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Earning Your Eagle

Eagle Scout is the highest rank that is attainable in the Boy Scouts of America program.  Being an Eagle Scout will tell people much about who you are and provides a gateway to scholarships and job opportunities.

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Volunteer Opportunities

There are many ways to volunteer at a Troop.  Some of the opportunities require direct contact with youth, while others require little.  Some opportunities occur regularly and some are intermittent.  Our most successful Troops have all families doing something.

For those volunteering with youth you must be registered with the BSA and complete our Youth Protection Training module:

  • Ask your unit for an application form, download the form from the National website, pick one up from our troop leadership, roundtable or at the Chief Seattle Council Resource Center, 3120 Rainier Ave South, PO Box 440408, Seattle, WA 98114
  • Chief Seattle Council requires that each adult application be turned in with Youth Protection Training (YPT) completed and the completion certificate attached to the paper application or emailed to your District Executive 

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Chartering Partners

Each Cub Scout Pack, Boy Scout Troop or Venturing Crew is part of the community by partnering with a local organization to help guide and nurture the unit.  Chartering organizations may be civic, faith-based, or educational organizations.  By partnering with a local, community based organization, units will reflect the personality of the community it is serving.

For more information about how our Chartering Partner relationship works, click here.

Here is a fact sheet about our Chartering Partners, who they are and how many units they sponsor.

 

All instructors, support instructors and youth instructors are required to pre-register for PTC. Staff is only charged $10. For the purposes of having accurate counts for the caterer, we ask that all staff, pre-register online as soon as possible.

If you are teaching a class by yourself and don’t have a buddy then please try and secure one. As we know things happen. We’ve all had those 3 AM phone calls with unexpected emergencies that call us away. If you have a backup, we won’t have to cancel the class and disappoint the participants. Please email me with the contact info (name, email address) of your teaching buddy so that our records are complete.

Send the names of all assistant instructors (including youth) to PTC Administration (chiefseattleptc@gmail.com).  We want to know who they are so they can be properly recognized and thanked. All assistant instructors must register for the event.

Presentation Materials

Send your printing requirements to West Niver (nivewl1@gmail.com), by Sunday morning, October 14th. West will print your documents and they will be there for you in the morning with your instructor packet. Please keep printing requests to a minimum. Please note, we are not able to reimburse for any printing costs you personally incur.

Please email your presentation materials (syllabus, PowerPoint, handouts, etc.) to Gary Burd (gary@beagledreams.com) so he can post the materials to https://seattlebsa.org/ptc-documents/2018. If your files are too large to email, please use https://wetransfer.com/ to upload and send the files.

Classrooms

Classroom assignments can be seen in the days leading up to PTC on the PTC Dashboard. Classroom assignments are not final until Friday morning, October 19th. 

Each classroom has a computer with internet access and a ceiling mounted projector. Please present from a thumb-drive using the classroom computer.

We prefer that you use the classroom computer for presenting instead of a personal laptop. Using the classroom computer helps smooth the transition between classes. If you do choose to use your own laptop for presenting, please be aware that that you are not allowed to disconnect the classroom computer from the projector and there is no IT support for troubleshooting connectivity problems with your laptop.

Detailed instructions on how to use the equipment will be emailed to you the week before PTC and will be printed in your instructor packet. Wi-Fi is available on campus.

If your class has any special facility needs, please let Dale Rae (dale@dfrae.com) know by Thursday, October 11th. Some examples of special needs are: VHS (video tape capability is NOT standard), unobstructed floor space, access to water for cooking, outdoor access, anything not in a modern tech-savvy classroom. DVDs can be played in on the classroom computers.

Be prepared: bring your own whiteboard markers just in case your classroom doesn't have any.

Please be aware that there are six sessions in most classrooms during the day, so please be mindful of the shared space.

Evaluation and Attendance

Participants are asked to submit an evaluation and attendance record for each class session. Evaluations are used to plan next year’s PTC. The attendance record is used for the participant's official training record. Participants can submit evaluation and attendance records using the paper form printed on the back of their schedule or online at seaptc.org. 

The process for paper forms is:

Hand out attendance stickers at the end of each class session. The attendance stickers are included in your instructor packet. The participant attaches the sticker in the space provided on the form and writes their feedback on the form.

The process for online evaluation is:

Display a four digit evaluation and attendance code on the last slide of your presentation or write the code on the whiteboard. The four digit evaluation and attendance code is included in the instructor packet and emailed to you the week before the event. The participant uses this code at seaptc.org to begin the evaluation process.

The sticker and four digit code serve as proof of attendance. Do not hand them out until the end of each class session.

If you are teaching a class in session 6, you will be given event patches for each participant. Hand these patches out in exchange for the paper form or the participant showing you the "Evaluation Completed" page on seaptc.org.  Return the completed paper forms to PTC Administration in the Wellness Center before you leave for the day.

The day of the event

Classrooms open at 7am.

Opening ceremony starts at 8:15am SHARP!

Pick up your instructors packet at the “Instructors” location in the Wellness Center. There is a packet for each class. The packet contains the following:

  • Instructions for using and logging into the classroom computers
  • Copies of any hand-outs requested.
  • Attendance stickers and code. 
  • Your own personalized schedule and evaluation form.
  • Event patches for session six instructors.
  • Scout Shop samples if applicable.

Return any Scout Shop samples to the Scout Shop in the Wellness Center.

Session 6 instructors should return completed paper evaluation forms and unused event patches to PTC Administration in the Wellness Center.

Everybody entering your classroom should be wearing an official PTC name tag. Scouters without name tags should register and checkin at the Wellness Center. Non-scouters should go to security office on the ground floor of the College Center building for assistance.  Please also be mindful that there are weekend classes being held in various rooms on campus, so you may encounter NSC students and faculty.

If you wish to change your classes, you may do so by emailing chiefseattleptc@gmail.com or going to the walk-in registration table (with the computers) to have your schedule changed. Due to classroom capacity constraints, we may not be able to accommodate all requests.

Click here to download a map and directions to North Seattle College, with instructions where to park.

Wear your scouting uniform if you have one.

Check-in and registration begins at 7:40am in the Wellness Center (Gym) on the East side of the college (closest to the freeway), with several large parking lots nearby. Parking is free for our event. The Wellness Center stands out, as it is one of two gray buildings on campus, and can be seen from I-5.

Pick up your printed schedule and badge in the Wellness Center.

The opening ceremony begins promptly at 8:15am; the final classes end at 5:00pm, and there will not be a closing ceremony.

The PTC has a mobile-friendly website at seaptc.org. Use the website to lookup your personal conference schedule, submit class evaluations and view a map of the campus. Login with the  ID # printed on your schedule and badge.

You can easily connect with your new Scouting friends using the QR code printed on their badge. Scan the code with a QR reader to add the person’s contact info to your phone’s address book.

Lunch is included as part of your registration. Please dine at the location printed on your schedule. If you requested a vegetarian, gluten free, or vegan lunch when you registered, there will be a specially labeled lunch with your name on it reserved for you in the location printed on your schedule.

Many of the classes require attendance all day in order to receive credit on your official BSA training record.

It is important to submit an evaluation and attendance record for each class. The attendance record is used as your official training record for the conference. The evaluations will be used to plan next year’s PTC. You can submit evaluation and attendance records from your mobile device at seaptc.org or use the paper form printed on the back of your schedule.

If you use the paper form to submit evaluation and attendance records, then be sure collect a sticker from each instructor as proof of your attendance. Give the paper form to the instructor of your last class to receive the event patch.

If you use seaptc.org to submit evaluation and attendance records, then show the evaluation completed page to the instructor of the last class to receive the event patch. You will receive a confirmation email at the end of the day with the details of your training record.

The Scout Shop is open from 7:30 AM to 5:00 PM in the Wellness Center.

Visit the Midway between 9:00 AM and 2:40 PM to meet representatives from scouting groups, programs and camps. The Midway is located on the upper level of the Wellness Center.

Please be mindful that North Seattle College is a public setting and that weekend classes will be in session with students throughout the campus, as well as other outside groups renting space on campus.
 

3CharactersVisits to elementary schools are a vital part of our recruiting efforts and also a great way for families to see who, in their neighborhood, is involved in Cub Scouts.  To know how to exactly approach a school to visit, please check out the information provided by National about how to make the relationship between Scouting and the school successful.

Lunch time is a good time for access, it does not interrupt the school day or the classroom. Once your Join Night is set, work with the school and their procedures to set up and distribute recruitment information during lunch time and advertise your night time registration meeting.

  • Create a display area in the lunch room. Your display may include a uniform, pinewood derby cars, rain gutter boats, a scrapbook of activities or a photo presentation on a lap top.
  • Lunch time is a good time for access; it does not interrupt the school day or the classroom. Once your Join Night is set, work with the school and their procedures to set up and distribute recruitment information during lunch time and advertise your night time registration meeting.
    • Create a display area in the lunch room. Your display may include a uniform, pinewood derby cars, rain gutter boats, a scrapbook of activities or a photo presentation on a lap top.
    • Have something fun to give the kids at lunch time to take home that includes the recruitment night information and the name and number of the membership chair. Council will have Boys Life mini-magazines, stickers, and flyers to hand out.

More Suggestions:

  • If you have a display, make an announcement during lunch letting everyone know that you are there and to stop by your display area. Sticker the everyone as they stop by. If you do not have a display, make an announcement about Cub Scouts, and then sticker them.
  • Encourage current Cub Scouts to wear their uniforms or Pack T-shirts to school on recruitment day.
  • Do not limit recruiting to any specific grade level, recruit from K to 4th grade. Even if your pack does not have a den for a particular grade. Have them come to Join Night. Contact your District Executive to find a pack with a den that they can join.
  • Invite a local Scout troop, ship, or crew representative to join you and recruit older Scout age youth.
  • Contact the recruiter for the Girl Scouts and try to set something up at lunch time for the same day.
  • With the school's permission, post signs around the school listing the time, date and location of your Join Night.
  • Have a Cub Scout make the morning announcements on the intercom and include a plug for Cub Scouts.
  • Be creative, work within the culture and personality of your community. If you have been doing the same thing for several years, then try something new!
  • Not able to make an in-school visit or distribute materials? Check out the Elementary School Relationships page. 

As an alternative to Lunch Time, a school "Meet Your Teacher" event is a good opportunity to introduce Elementary School boys to Scouting in the presence of their Parents.

Here are some great suggestions for spreading the word about your Cub Scout Pack and registration night in the local community:

  • List your Registration Night in your local newspaper; include all schools from your area.
  • Write a letter to the editor of your local newspaper, personalize the letter.
  • Encourage an Eagle Scout to write a letter to the editor sharing the scouting experience.
  • Place flyers along mailboxes in neighborhoods served by pack.
  • Place yard signs around neighborhood entrances, just off school property, street medians, sport fields, and in the front yard of current families.  Put a sign at the street entrance of grocery stores and the intersection near your local grocery store.
  • Put flyers in the local library with the help of your District Executive.
  • Put flyers on any community area service board you can find.
  • Create "Mobile Recruiting Packets" for people you meet.  This packet could include items you think would provide information about our program and your individual unit:
    • Welcome letter
    • Pack Calendar
    • Invite to next Pack activity
    • Onboarding postcard
    • Boys Life mini-magazine
    • Pack leader biographies
  • Host a bike rodeo, scavenger hunt or any event that provides youth an activity at the school one evening.
  • Encourage current Cub Scouts to #BringAFriend. Give the Cub Scout a gift certificate for ice cream, or a cookie store for bringing a friend and his parents to Membership Registration Night or any other night. Recognize the scout at the pack meeting if the new member is recruited. Let the youth introduce the friend.
  • Create a trading card (Peer Card) with your pack information including when the meeting takes place and contact information.  Ask your Cub Scouts to pass them out.  Create several trading cards with pictures of various outings or fun events such as archery, pine wood derby cars or fishing.
  • Create a business card for your pack.
  • Have a wooden nickel stamped with your pack number and meeting time for the scouts to pass out to friends.
  • Hold a Pinewood Derby Day!  Take your pinewood derby track outdoors and have a lot of cars to race.
  • At a public swimming pool hold a swimming party.  Make the event a dual-purpose event, a fun activity for the current Cubs and invite your target membership.  Have a number of swimming activities planned.
  • Hold a Geocaching event and pass out a segment for the completed activity for their first award.
  • Create a video of your Pack having fun and post to YouTube (with permission of the youth and their parents of course!)

    In addition the National Membership website also has great ideas and resources for recruiting in the community as well as some ideas for recruiting events.  These are updated frequently so check them regularly!  

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Financial Audit

Consolidated Financial Statements
For the Years Ended: December 31, 2016 and 2015

Form 990

2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016

What is STEM?

STEM stands for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics.  To increase STEM awareness in Scouts, BSA created the NOVA & SUPERNOVA Awards Programs.

NOVA  Awards are designed in a way to make learning fun!  These awards are optional.  For each STEM topic there are 5 or 6 requirements for the scout to accomplish.  For each Scout Rank - the requirements are the same, except they become more detailed and in depth as they progress.

The Nova Program is based upon the accomplishment of specific requirements and achievements for Cub Scouts and Webelos Scouts, merit badges for Boy Scouts, and activity areas for Venture Scouts.  It has been designed to enhance those program activities, using adult counselors who are already familiar with STEM topics to guide Scout explorations and provide quality control to the advancement process.

Adults working with Scouts in the Nova Badge should be trained as a Nova Counselor.  

SUPERNOVA Awards are designed to challenge those who like the STEM fields to learn even more. They are designed to be a longer term - requiring many hours and more in depth study of the field.  At the Venturer level, the Supernova may require over 300 hours of work.

The Supernova Program gives Scouts the opportunity to learn fundamentals of STEM topics, while working for significant accomplishments in extending program activities through original STEM-based experiments and projects.  Adult mentors who are accomplished and qualified STEM practitioners guide Scouts through the program, and provide quality advancement opportunities.

Adults working with Scouts in the Supernova Badge should be trained as a Supernova Mentor.  Training available at the annual PTC, Aurora District Merit Badge Fair, or by special arrangement.  



Adult Leader Guidelines

* The Nova & Super Nova awards are part of the
    BSA advancement program, which includes Merit Badges.
* Therefore, the Counselors / Mentors follow all the
    rules set up for the Merit badge counselors. 
* Nova / Super Nova is an additional registration for Adults.
   It is free, but requires paperwork and approvals.
* Youth Protection Training and Nova Counseling (code D83) is required.   
* The list of approved STEM Counselors / mentors will be sent to the scoutmasters with the regular updates to the Merit Badge Counselor lists. 

Counselors are Adults approved to work with and sign off on the Nova Awards.  Nova Award adult counselors need to be registered with the Council. Except a parent working only with their Cub Scout, and no others. 

Mentors are Adults approved to work with and sign off on the Super Nova Awards.  Super Nova Award adult Mentors must be registered with the Council.

HOW TO REGISTER:

Potential counselors and or mentors must register with the Boy Scouts of America. 
(1.)  Complete the BSA's Adult Application form (if you are not registered with BSA currently) In the District position box at the top of the form, enter: code 52 Supernova Mentor or code 58 Nova Counselor.
(2.)  Nova Counselors - Fill out pdf Nova Counselor form .(Code 58)        
(3.)  Supernova Mentors must fill out the pdf BSA Supernova Awards Mentor Information form  (Code 52)
        (You will be notified when your application is accepted)
(4.)  Complete Youth Protection Training annually. (Go online at My.Scouting.org and take the appropriate Youth Protection Training)
(5.)  Turn into your Advancement Chair, or District Merit Badge Counselor committee Chair, or your District Executive.

Renewal of this registration and youth protection training annually is necessary to continue as a Super Nova mentor.  You will be contacted via email in April / or May to confirm registration. A Nova counselor may counsel any Scout, including his own daughter or son - although this is discouraged in order to offer a Scout the chance to meet a diverse group of outstanding adults. Supernova Mentors may NOT be the parent or unit leader of their son or daughter unless the Scout is in a group of participants. A Nova Counselor may also serve as a Supernova Mentor, with all the correct paperwork completed and with approved by the Council.

What Is a Nova Counselor and Supernova Mentor?

A Nova Counselor and Supernova mentor are both teachers and mentors to the Scout as he or she works on the Nova or Supernova award.  A Nova Counselor need not be a specialist in STEM topics, but is willing to work with Scouts to facilitate their exploration and learning of the technical topics and completion of projects.  A Supernova mentor is very much like a merit badge counselor for Boy Scouts but specializing in STEM topics in greater depth than in merit badges.

Nova counselors and Supernova mentors should be satisfied that each Scout under their guidance meets all the requirements set forth for the award. In this sense, a counselor or mentor is an examiner. In a larger sense, the real opportunity for a counselor/mentor lies in coaching -  helping Scouts over the different hurdles of the requirements and helping make them aware of the deeper aspects of the subject from their knowledge and experience.  Like merit badge counseling, you can not delete or add requirements to the program. 

The Supernova mentor leads the Scout to learn by research and doing. The mentor may help a Scout by providing instruction and more in-depth guidance on the subject matter. However, the counselor or mentor must not complete the Scout's work on the requirements. The counselor or mentor must test the Scout to ensure that the work is completed to meet the requirements but may not modify the award requirements in the process. This standard ensures that the advancement requirements are fair and uniform for all Scouts.



Cub Scout Resources:

Structure of the Program

This is the time to set the stage for a Cub Scout's lifetime of interest and curiosity about STEM fields. The Nova and Supernova awards are available to Wolf, Bear, and Webelos Scouts. Counselors should understand that the awards are optional and meant to be earned only after a Cub Scout has achieved his rank.

There are seven Nova awards, four for Science, and on for each of the T-E-M areas, and each Cub Scout & Webelo Scout can earn all seven. Completion of any Nova award earns the Scout the right to wear the Nova award patch. Completion of each additional Nova award is recognized by a pi (π) pin placed on the patch.  Each of these awards builds on STEM-related adventures, involves hands-on activities, and often includes a field trip.

The seven Nova awards for Cub Scouts and Webelo Scouts are:
Click on the graphic to open a worksheet, or the Nova Guidebook.

Cub Scout Nova Awards Guide book (includes Supernova program)

There are two Supernova awards.

The Cub Scout Supernova award can be earned by Wolf or Bear Cub Scouts. The Webelos Supernova award can be earned by Webelos Scouts.  Each boy may earn both Supernova awards, as long as he is registered in the appropriate program at the time he completes the requirements.  The Supernova awards recognize superior achievement in the STEM fields and require significantly more effort by the Cub Scout than a nova awards.  For Supernova Awards, a Super Nova Awards Mentor (who serves much like a Boy Scout’s merit badge counselor) is required. Completion of a Supernova award earns the Cub Scout or Webelos Scout the right to wear the Supernova award medal. Each of these awards involves STEM-related achievements (for Wolf and Bear Cub Scouts), achievements (for Webelos Scouts), and extensive independent work.

Click on the name for a worksheet to help with the award.  Always consult the current book for any changes.  You must use the most current book.



Boy Scout Resources

Structure of the Program

The Nova awards are available to all Boy Scouts and are optional. Requirements must be completed while registered as a Boy Scout and before aging out of the program.

There are four Nova awards—one for each of the STEM areas—and each Boy Scout can earn all four. Completion of any Nova award earns the Boy Scout the right to wear the Nova award patch. Completion of each additional STEM Nova award is recognized by a pi (π) pin placed on the patch. Each of these awards builds on STEM-related merit badges, involves hands-on activities, and often includes a field trip.

The four Nova awards for Boy Scouts are the following:
Click on the icon below to open a worksheet to use.

Supernova Awards

The Supernova awards recognize superior achievement in the STEM fields and require significantly more effort by the Boy Scout than the Nova awards. The Supernova awards are available to all Boy Scouts who have achieved the rank of First Class. The Supernova has two levels, and each Boy Scout may earn both Supernova awards.
Level 1 requires the Scout to have earned any three of the four Boy Scout Nova awards. 
Level 2 requires completion of the fourth Boy Scout Nova award in addition to the Harris Supernova Award as a prerequisite.

For all Supernova awards, a mentor, who serves much like a merit badge counselor, is required. Completion of a Supernova award earns the Boy Scout the right to wear the Supernova award medal. Each of these awards involves completion of STEM-related merit badges, completion of Nova awards, and extensive independent work.

Click on the graphic to open the worksheet.

The Supernova awards include activity topics. An activity topic is a two-part, hands-on, high-level activity related to one of the STEM fields. Part 1 involves research, preparation, set up, coordination, and/or organization.  Part 2 involves analysis and reflection, culminating in the creation of a report in any one of the available format options. See the “Supernova Activity Topics” chapter in your Boy Scout Nova Award Guidebook.

 


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Venture Scout Resources

Structure of the Program 

The Nova and Supernova awards are available to all Venturers. The awards are optional. Requirements must be completed while registered as a Venturer (with two exceptions as noted below) and before aging out. There are four Nova awards—one for each of the STEM areas.  With slight variations, the Venturer Nova awards are equivalent to the Boy Scout Nova awards. Therefore, Nova awards in the same STEM field cannot be earned in both programs.  Thus, Venturers can earn Nova  awards in all fields  for which they  do not already have a Boy  Scout Nova  award. Completion of any Nova award earns the Venturer the right to wear the Nova award patch. Completion of each additional Nova award is recognized by a pi (π) pin placed on the patch. Each of these awards builds on STEM-related explorations involves hands-on activities and often includes a field trip.  The activities are roughly comparable in scope, difficulty, and effort to Boy Scout merit badges, but with more freedom of choice.

The four Nova awards for Venture Scouts are the following:
Click on the icon below to open a worksheet to use. 

Supernova Awards

There are three Supernova awards for Venturers - first, second, and third level awards - with each level being a prerequisite for the next. With slight variations, the first two levels of the Venturer Supernova awards are equivalent to the two levels of the Boy Scout Supernova awards. Therefore, Venturers who earned a Boy Scout Supernova award while a Boy Scout may use that to satisfy a prerequisite for the Venturer Supernova award at the next higher level.
Click on the graphic to open the worksheet.

The Supernova awards recognize superior achievement in the STEM fields and require significantly more effort by the Venturer than the Nova awards. In particular, the third-level Supernova award is best suited for college students, although it is attainable for highly motivated high school students. For all Supernova awards, a mentor, who serves much like a merit badge counselor, is required. Completion of a Supernova award earns the Venturer the right to wear the appropriate Supernova medal. Each of these awards involves completion of STEM-related explorations, completion of Nova awards, and extensive independent work. The Supernova awards include activity topics. An activity topic is a two-part, hands-on, high-level activity related to one of the STEM fields. Part 1 involves research, preparation, set up, coordination, and/or organization.  Part 2 involves analysis and reflection, culminating in the creation of a report in any one of the available format options. See the “Supernova Activity Topics” chapter.


STEM Scouts:
This is a pilot program through BSA National.  Find more info at this link: https://stemscouts.org/pilot-program/